Research in wind energy is undertaken at various scales – urban, onshore and offshore. The first addressed UK field trails with turbine capacities >5kW (micro wind turbines), the 2nd  was geared to identify factors that may influence the planning acceptance of onshore wind, whilst the latter mapped offshore wind energy resources and energy yields in the Middle East providing a blue print for sites development in the region.

In the UK national trial on micro wind turbines, the Energy and Climate Change Division team played a pivotal role in the monitoring and analysis of the results from 75 test sites across the UK. This has resulted in guidelines for such turbine utilisations.

In onshore wind, research undertaken aims at identifying factors that may influence planning acceptance, integrating the results into a spatial model of onshore wind energy providing the most likely suitable locations for “least resistance” development.

In offshore wind, research addresses wind energy potential with a particular focus in the Middle East, where there is a paucity of information around the resource, its locations and infrastructure needs. This seminal research is based on the development of new, more accurate estimates of available resources and predicted energy yields, taking into account appropriate constraints such as shipping lanes, nature reserves, electrical grid etc, presenting the first mapping of the potential for offshore wind energy in the region.


Latest updates:

Assessment of Urban Microgeneration Solutions 2009

The group’s research is looking at existing housing developments from the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s to determine the scope and potential impact of microgeneration technologies and energy efficiency measures on the residential scale. Microgeneration options assessed include: Photovoltaics Micro wind power Solar thermal systems for domestic hot water CHP (combined heat and power) at the individual house and small ...

UK Micro Wind Trial 2007

The UK has the best wind resource in Europe and this is now starting to be harnessed through both on-shore and off-shore multi-MW scale wind farms. Micro wind power technology, which is essentially the installation of small scale, 1-10 kW wind turbines on buildings or pole mounted as shown in Figure 1, is a rapidly ...

The story of the 'Smiths' in their 1930's semi 2007

Residential housing accounts for more than a quarter of the UK’s primary energy consumption. This is primarily in the form of space heating (typical 3 bedroom UK house 20,000 kWh per annum) with electrical demands being much lower at around 4,000 kWh per annum. The gradual tightening of building regulations means that modern housing consumes ...

Photovoltaics in Residential Applications 2007

Residential grid connected PV systems are relatively simple to design with easy to predict annual yields. However, the headline economics of residential PV in the UK are at present unattractive. A typical small residential PV system (1 to 3 kWp) as shown in the top figure would cost in the year 2000 around £4,500 per ...

Micro Wind Modelling Tool 2007

Within the framework of a research project funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) a micro wind modelling tool has been developed by SERG prompted by the imminent arrival of the technology. The tool allows the user to define a particular micro wind turbine and simulate its performance at various locations in the UK. Various ...

PV Roof Tile Development – POWERTILE 2000

Capital cost is the major issue and this impacts most directly on the size of a PV roof tile. For the ‘best integration’ a PV roof tile should be indentical in size and weight to a normal concrete tile. For example, a Marley Modern tile would provide an exposed area of 292 x 345 mm ...